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2014 Law Day
May 1, 2014 from 9:00 am to 12:30 pm

For the seventh year, Law Clerks’ Society members participated in the Supreme Judicial Court’s Law Day Program. This year’s theme was “American Democracy and the Rule of Law: Why Every Vote Matters.”  The theme was intended to commemorate the upcoming 50th anniversaries of the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act.

For the seventh year, Law Clerks’ Society members participated in the Supreme Judicial Court’s Law Day Program. This year’s theme was “American Democracy and the Rule of Law: Why Every Vote Matters.”  The theme was intended to commemorate the upcoming 50th anniversaries of the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act.
The morning began with Theatre Espresso’s production of “Justice at War: The Story of the Japanese Internment Camps.” The play tells the story of Mitsuye Endo, a young woman being held at the Topaz Internment Camp during the second World War. With the help of the American Civil Liberties Union, she takes her case contending that the detention is unconstitutional all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. Citing the government’s constitutional right to suspend “the Writ of Habeas Corpus… in cases of Rebellion or Invasion,” Solicitor General Fahey defends the existence of the camps. In the role of Supreme Court Justices, students heard testimony, interrogated witnesses, and reflected on crucial questions raised by the case. Finally, students decided whether the internment camps were a matter of national security or a product of racism.